Paris

Restaurants

Richer

Dinner was in the Ninth, which has also been feeling the Brooklyn influence. It consisted of fabulous burrata and melt-in-your-mouth pork cheek at Richer.

Le Dauphin

East of the Canal, a world-class lunch beckoned. Le Dauphin is chef Inaki Aizpitarte’s follow-up to adjoining Chateaubriand. The Rem Koolhaas–codesigned white-marble dining room is cool enough, but it’s the inventive tapas menu (think crabmeat with pesto-bulgur salad and pearls of horseradish cream) and solid selection of vins naturels that put us in a jolly mood.

Maria Luisa

The Neapolitan-style pies here (margarita, caprese, and so on) are the best pizza in the district. Easygoing environs perfect for sharing with friends.

Le Clown Bar

Taking cleverly carnivalesque décor to epic levels, this peculiar café-bistro has scored a plugged-in following for its solid food as well, with dishes like grilled Guilvinec langoustines and pigeon with fennel salad.

Glou

This trendy loft-style spot scores points for its lively vibe (aided by communal tables) and excellent wines by the glass.

Le Mary Celeste

The nautical-themed décor sets a gentle stage for full-on cocktail expertise. Add Blackwater oysters and you’ve got one of the city’s freshest happy-hour spots. 

Le Progrès & La Perle

At any given moment, every Parisian neighborhood has a couple fashionable bistros where the elements mysteriously come together to form the perfect apéro spot with a dash of people-watching. In the Marais, these are the ones.

Kinugawa

For dinner the beautiful people set and supremely appetizing omakase menu at (6) Kinugawa, back in the First, is a must.

Frenchie

Less is more at this hit restaurant: neither lunch nor weekends; a mere twenty seats; two services an evening; two appetizers and main plates to choose from. The wine bar and takeout service are popular alternatives.

Saturne

Chef Sven Chartier and sommelier Ewen Lemoigne serve up great wines and simple dishes (tuna with sea-urchin foam, smoked eel with roasted quince and mushrooms) made from pristine ingredients within Nordic-zen environs. 

Kunitoraya 2

A noodle shop in a wonderfully restored (and in some cases untouched) turn-ofthe- century Parisian canteen. The homemade udon here is a perfect lunch; onigiri and bento are options, too. 

Yam’ Tcha

This triumphant Chinese-French fusion concept pairs flavorful teas with dishes like cold noodles with squid and white sesame. A memorable culinary experience. 

Le Fumoir

Modeled on colonial watering holes of the 1920s, Le Fumoir is a place to lounge in a Chesterfield with a whisky, a game of backgammon, and a newspaper, all of which this genial bar-restaurant keeps on hand. 

Le Louchebem

The tender spring lamb is one of dozens of carnivore-pleasing menu items at this sizzling, lip-smacking relic of the old working-class markets of Les Halles. Fearless carnivores can try exotic off-cuts.

Harry’s New York Bar

Erected a century ago from a dismantled New York saloon, this storied American-style tavern charms with its aged wood paneling and decades-old college pennants. An institution.

Ralphs

At a four-year-old Ralph Lauren outpost, in a beautifully restored townhouse on the Boulevard Saint-Germain, we got a glorious dose of signature Americana. Lunch at (3) Ralph’s, the hot-spot restaurant, was a no-brainer, and we settled into the patio’s wroughtiron chairs for top-notch hamburgers and lobster salad.

La Société

La Société, a see-and-be-seen dining spot from the legendary Costes brothers. Decorated by Christian Liaigre, it serves up fashionista-friendly dishes like tuna tartare and Thai-spiced roast shrimp. 

L’Arpège

Chef Alain Passard has mentored loads of younger Parisian restaurateurs, and has been instrumental in guiding French cooking toward vegetables. This grandmaster sources his produce from his own organic farms—and his Left Bank restaurant (bearing three Michelin stars) enlivens them in ways that defy belief.

Restaurant David Toutain

Less than a year old, this young chef’s namesake bistro is on fire. Elegantly artisanal décor complements dishes that make beautiful, inventive use of seasonal produce. 

L’Avant Comptoir

Yves Camdeborde serves updated, bite-size French classics—pig’s-foot croquettes, oxtail canapés with horseradish cream—in a tiny, chairless hors d’oeuvres bar. Charcuterie this good is worth standing for.

La Palette

Boasting a legit bohemian legacy, this Art Deco bar is pure, old-school Latin Quarter

Ma Cocotte

Ma Cocotte, a 250-seat bistro designed by Philippe Starck, has become a humming weekend lunch spot since opening less than a year ago. Located in a converted warehouse, with an ivy-draped brick and zinc façade and deco items sourced mostly from the puces, it’s the perfect place for a laid-back lunch between rounds of treasure hunting.


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