White Pike Whiskey: Wiskey From Madison Avenue

Mar 10, 2014

If you are unfamiliar with what’s currently occurring within the American distillation world, the last few years have seen the founding of many new craft distilleries focusing on locally sourced ingredients and traditional distillation methods.  Like the craft brewery movement that has revolutionized the American beer scene, many of these distilleries are producing unique products that in our opinion, show a dedication to quality that deserves attention.

White Pike, the result of a collaboration between upstate New York’s Finger Lake Distilling and New York City’s Mother Advertising Agency is a white whiskey designed to be pleasing by itself, but also made to be mixed in a wide variety of cocktails.  White whiskeys, often being made from corn based mash and never aged past the bare minimum – White Pike is aged 18 minutes – have a unique place in American history and unlike their highly complex, well aged cousins Irish Whisky, Scotch, or Bourbon, white whiskeys often have a lighter, amount sweet taste.  That being said, rarely would one call a white whiskey “mellow.”  It’s pretty hard to hide imperfections with a spirit that never sees the inside of an oak barrel.

By itself, we were pleasantly surprised at how smooth and well balanced White Pike tasted.  Unlike other white whiskeys, White Pike has a mellowness to it that is both surprising and delightful.  Although White Pike is not a particularly unique white whiskey in regards to flavors, White Pike is a particularly well done classic white whiskey.  We tried our bottle both warm and cold and although very different at each temperature, we could not find anything we didn’t like about the spirit.  In fact, add a bit of water and the white whiskey becomes extremely palatable and easier to sip while enjoying the developing flavors.

As a mixture, White Pike really shows its true colors.  It’s sweetness complements fruit juices very well and citrus fruits in particular mix well with White Pike’s tangy, almost sour notes.  We actually think White Pike may be a great way to add some complexity to citrus based vodka cocktails.  That being said, we wanted to try out a recipe and after much discussion at our initial tasting session, we decided we should prepare a hair of the dog drink apply called, The Morning After.

How to make a White Pike Morning After Cocktail


  • Old Fashioned glass
  • White Pike white whiskey
  • A lemon (or 2oz lemon juice)
  • Grade B maple syrup
  • Muddled fresh blueberries
  • Stirring spoon
  • Ice


  1. In an Old Fashioned glass, add 2 oz of White Pike White Whiskey along with the juice of a lemon
  2. Add blueberries to the glass and gently muddle them
  3. Add 1 oz of grade B maple syrup
  4. Add Ice to the liquid approaches the top of the glass
  5. Gently stir the cocktail until the syrup is mixed with the rest of the ingredients
  6. Add more syrup for personal taste if desired and re-stir
  7. Add a slice of lemon for garnishment

-Brian David Joyner

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