Bodyboards and Handplanes by Danny Hess

Mar 17, 2014


Being a surfboard shaper requires a rare level of expert craftsmanship – especially the sustainable boards from Hess surfboards in San Francisco. They are made from reclaimed California hardwood and crafted entirely by hand, one at a time. As the gifted creator Danny Hess says, “Salvaged and responsibly harvested wood is by far the best material for engineering a light, responsive and durable board.

Instead of using pre-formed polyurethane blanks which is the current norm among mass manufactured brands, Danny Hess painstakingly takes the time to diligently carve, shape and smooth out each individual board by hand. His ultimate goal is to create stronger, faster and more durable boards that give the surfer the ultimate surfing experience.

The dedication required for such an undertaking is substantial, and his expertise is aided by the fact that he’s an avid surfer himself. When he’s done shaping a piece of reclaimed poplar, rednut or walnut wood into a Hess surfboard, it has to meet the  exceedingly high standards he’s set for himself. If it doesn’t, it’s back to the drawing board.

As Danny Hess states, “I build these to last. My goal has always been to build a beautiful, functional board that you never have to replace.”

Be sure to browse our fine selection of Hess boards here.

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