The Finishing Details: Vintage Lanvin Cufflinks

Mar 25, 2014


Oft times, a gentleman who pays attention to the finer details of dressing is mistaken for being an over-indulgent dandy. Let’s be clear, these are two different types of animals all together. The latter often dresses for the benefit of spectacle, and the former makes it a point to be meticulous and sartorially aware.

Take these vintage Lanvin cufflinks for example. They are made by one of the oldest fashion houses in Paris (long before Alber Elbaz had his first gruyere-filled omelette). The sterling silver used was smelted in Germany, with a high purity percentage of 92.5% – This is verified by the “925″ engraving on them. It’s further embellished with beautiful silver links, and precision-cut, precious black stones.

Worn with a formal black-tie ensemble, these cufflinks serve as the perfect finishing touch, and an accessory you can be sure no one else in a 1000-mile radius will be wearing. This is exactly what we mean by focusing on the finishing touches.

See this piece in our online shop here and peruse our array of curated accessories here.

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