MOTW Editor-In-Chief Alan Maleh | Ovadia & Sons

Mar 25, 2014

 

For Issue 2 of Man of the World, our publisher & editor-in-chief Alan Maleh sat down with twin brothers, Ariel and Shimon Ovadia – they are the duo behind Ovadia & Sons, one of the most important menswear brands of the moment. We invite you to enjoy their conversation below.

How did you both recognize that the “future” of men’s fashion lay in classicism?   

We recognized what we loved and wanted to wear. It wasn’t a conscious decision to recognize what the “future” of men’s fashion would be. For us it was a natural process, we just wanted to make clothing that we want to wear. The items we create are a reflection of what excites and inspire us. It’s our vision and adventure through clothing.

How do you combine your colors? How do you pick your fabrics?

We always start with asking ‘What do we want to wear?’ By playing with textures and colors, we create a unique blend that draws the eye. The color stories and fabrics are inspired by everything from the places we’ve traveled, to vintage photographs, antiques and old movies.

Some items have a subtle funny twist to them:  the same tone of shirt and tie, the Hawaiian shirt comeback. Can you discuss your inspiration for Spring?

There is a laid-back, bohemian, military feel that has a worn in feel with washed fabrics, loosely woven knitwear and indigo tones. The group features hand-made, indigo tie-dye oxford shirts worn with distressed chinos and a vintage inspired military combat jacket. We pair it with a vintage bandana as a neckerchief to complete the look.

The next group is inspired by a recent trip to France. We created suits in lightweight fabrics and patterns. There’s a navy-on-navy, seersucker, cotton suit which we paired with a featherweight, indigo, plaid shirt and matching tie. We also showed a linen, tan, houndstooth suit with a fuchsia and white, striped shirt and a cotton Hawaiian print ivory tie.

Can you discuss how the desire for travel inspires your work?

We’re heavily influenced by the places we’ve been and the things we’ve seen on the way. We’ve designed collections around a trip to the South of France and most recently to Morocco and Tokyo. The inspiration comes from the food to the architecture and bazaars. And we always want to see the antiques – of course that’s the key!

Which of your pieces is based on classic, iconic models?

We like to take classic familiar pieces that we love and reinterpret them. We’ve been collecting vintage clothing since the age of fifteen. That was our hobby. There’s a lot of influence from the past and a hint of familiarity each season but it’s done in our way and in our vision. The results are authentic but new and exciting at the same time.

You guys are also collectors: do you have a method for collecting, or is it just falling in love with a piece? Are there specific things you collect?

We buy things that speak to us because we genuinely appreciate and love them. Some things we collect are vintage luggage, military clothing and memorabilia, decorative objects, furniture, books and porcelain. We also appreciate rugs and old trinkets. A lot of the pieces end up in our apartments and some make it to our showroom. There really is no method to collecting!

I’m curious to know what it feels like to work with such a close family member? How do you divide the tasks?

We both share the same vision and enjoy a lot of the same things. We both have very strong opinions so we don’t really sugarcoat anything. We have to agree to disagree at times. We each oversee different categories but we’re both involved in each small detail on the design side and on the business end of things.


Related Posts

Taavo Takes New York
View Feature
Taavo Takes New York   How the founder of Freemans built the city of his dreams.
American Hustle
View Feature
American Hustle First-Amendment warrior Larry Flynt on Trump's lies, the wonders of sex, and his one true regret
Scosha
View Feature
Scosha On a warm summer afternoon, we met with Australian jeweler Scosha Woolridge at her Williamsburg storefront and studio on Grand Street in Williamsburg. Since 2013, she has been meticulously handcrafting her eponymous Brooklyn-based jewelry collection with the help from her husband, Joe,  and team of classically trained artisans.
Mexican Mule: A Spin On A Classic From South of the Border
View Feature
Mexican Mule: A Spin On A Classic From South of the Border The heat is on. Barbeques are on the horizon. Time to take a day off, and pour yourself a cold one. If you’re in the market for a new drink, we recommend a new spin on a classic, a Mexican Mule.  
Back to the Future, Italian-style
View Feature
Back to the Future, Italian-style A coffee-table book with all the right curves.
Back to The Journal
Liquid error: Could not find asset snippets/modify_lightbox_snippet.liquid